44 Little Cahill Road

Cary, IL  60013

Ph: 847-639-8847

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In-Plant CNC Training

Many of these topics are covered in our books, online classes, and CD-rom courses - and in a very cost effective manner. But some people find it much easier to learn when course content is presented face-to face, by a live instructor.

  • Questions can be answered right away.

  • Elaborations can be made if students are having difficulties.

  • Students can learn from one another during and after class.

  • And in general, students learn more easily in a face-to-face learning environment.

 

For these reasons, we can present our CNC training courses right in your facility. We can also customize content to match the kind of work you do and the machines you use.

Standard classes: 

Introduction To CNC

A one-day session designed to acquaint your people with CNC.

Not everyone in your company needs to be a CNC programmer, setup person, or operator. Yet there are people outside your CNC department that must have a good working knowledge of CNC in order to communicate intelligently with your CNC people. Design engineers, quality control people, manufacturing engineers, tooling engineers, managers, and foremen should all understand the practical basics of CNC in order to facilitate tasks for your CNC people.

In value added terms, these are your necessary support people. And one of the most important concepts of value added principles is that a prime responsibility of any necessary support person must be to enhance the performance of your value added people: CNC operators. Design engineers, for example, must understand how CNC operators adjust offsets in order to tolerance dimensions in a way that minimizes the number of calculations an operator must make. Though the design engineer will never actually run a CNC machine, they must possess a working knowledge of CNC.

In this short session, we will quickly acquaint people with the usage of CNC machining centers and/or turning centers (depending upon what kind of machines your company owns). We'll use our proven key concepts approach, but we'll simply introduce the reasoning behind each key concept - and won't get bogged down in the details.

This will expose people who would not normally be involved in your CNC environment with CNC. It will also improve communication among the various departments in your company, giving people a feel for what it takes to program, setup, and operate CNC machine tools. And of course, it will allow everyone to get their questions about CNC answered. Students will come away from this course with a new respect for your CNC people.

General:

  • Course name: Introduction To CNC

  • Machine types: Machining centers and/or turning centers

  • Prerequisites: None

  • Course length: one day (7.5 hours)

  • Presented by: Mike Lynch

  • Suggested course manual/s: Machining center manual and/or Turning center manual

  • Students should bring: Note taking materials and calculator

  • Recommended class size: 2 - 25 students

  • Recommended breaks: Ten minute break in morning and afternoon

 

Topics:

  1. Machine configurations and directions of motion

  2. General flow of programming

  3. Visualizing program execution

  4. Understanding program zero

  5. Determining the program zero position on the machine

  6. How program zero is assigned

  7. Introduction to programming words

  8. Preparation for programming

  9. Motion types (rapid, linear, circular)

  10. Compensation types and how offset adjustments are made

  11. How CNC programs are structured

  12. Special programming features

  13. Tasks related to setup and operation

  14. How CNC programs are verified

 

Machining Center Setup and Operation

A two-day course for your entry level people.

CNC operators comprise up to 70% of the CNC workforce. A company having ten CNC machines that is working three shifts will need but one or two CNC programmers and setup people. But if working machines with one operator per machine per shift, they will need thirty operators! It is getting more and more difficult to find and hire qualified CNC operators.

 

Unfortunately, most companies are forced to hire operators with little or no CNC experience - and train them on the job. Because of the sheer number of CNC operators required in most companies - and because new people must be trained as people leave for greener pastures - operator training is an on-going training need.

Most companies simply don't have the resources needed to develop and implement their own CNC operator training courses. So they leave newcomers to figure things out on their own. People with good CNC aptitude and motivation may be able to survive in this situation, but may become frustrated. People without CNC aptitude will fail miserably.

In this course, we present what it takes to be a CNC machining center operator from the ground up. We do assume students possess some basic skills like the ability to perform simple arithmetic calculations, ability to read a blueprint, ability to interpret tolerances, and ability to use the gauging tools your company uses. (We can teach these subjects, but course time must be expanded.) We assume nothing about their current CNC knowledge.

We present material as it relates to vertical machining centers (though we can also address horizontals). Specific techniques are given for the most popular control in the industry, the Fanuc control.

Depending on class size and machine availability, practice can be done on your own machine tools. However, we commonly find that a machine shop makes a very poor learning environment (noisy, distracting, tight quarters, etc.). For this reason, we prefer that training takes place in a classroom environment.

We use our proven key concepts approach to stress the reasons why things are done as importantly as how their done. While many of the key concepts are programming-related, there are many important principles of machine operation that require a limited understanding of how the machine interprets a program.

General:

  • Course name: Machining Center Operation

  • Machine types: Primarily three-axis machining centers (but we can also address horizontal machining centers)

  • Prerequisites: Knowledge of: blueprint reading, tolerance interpretation, basic arithmetic, gauge reading, and the hand tools your company uses

  • Course length: two days (15 hours)

  • Presented by: Mike Lynch

  • Suggested course manual/s: Machining center manual

  • Students should bring: Note taking materials and calculator

  • Recommended class size: 2 - 20 students

  • Recommended breaks: Five minute breaks each hour and a ten minute break in morning and afternoon

 

Topics:

  1. Machine configurations and directions of motion

  2. Important buttons and switches

  3. Modes of operation

  4. Key operation procedures

  5. The difference between setup and maintaining production

  6. Production-maintaining related tasks

  7. Workpiece loading

  8. Cycle activation buttons and switches

  9. Holding size with tool length compensation offsets

  10. Holding size with cutter radius compensation offsets

  11. Replacing cutting tools

  12. Understanding trial machining

  13. Setup-related tasks

  14. Workholding setup

  15. Assigning program zero

  16. Cutting tool assembly and measurement

  17. Program verification techniques

Machining Center Programming

A two-day manual programming course.

It's likely that you have some CNC people that need to be upgraded. And many CNC setup people and operators aspire to become programmers. This course makes an excellent way for to people that have had some CNC experience to get to a higher level.

You may also have CNC people that have worked exclusively with computer aided manufacturing (CAM) systems to prepare programs. These systems, of course, create the same G-code level CNC programs that a manual programmer writes. If your CAM system programmers are to make the best use of your CNC machine tools, they must possess a knowledge of manual programming.

 

This knowledge is required, for example, when programs must be modified at the machine during verification and optimizing. When production time is at a premium, it's usually best to prepare - or at least optimize - programs manually (most of the techniques we show in our setup and cycle time reduction courses require a firm understanding of manual programming).

In this course, students will learn the basics of manual programming. We'll use our proven key concepts approach, stressing the reasons why things are done as importantly as how they're done. We stress programming for three-axis vertical machining centers, but content can be expanded to include horizontal machining centers and rotary axes. Specific examples and techniques will be shown for the most popular control in the industry, the FANUC control. Practice exercises and programming activities will confirm understanding. We'll even visually demonstrate program execution on a computer software based simulator for each program students write.

Though review periods will be limited during the course due to time constraints, the tutorial course manual provides an excellent way for students to review the course content during the course, and long after the course is completed. We also offer free phone assistance to any student having a question when the course is completed.

General:

  • Course name: Machining Center Programming

  • Machine types: Primarily three-axis machining centers (but we can also address horizontal machining centers and rotary axes)

  • Prerequisites: An understanding of basic machining practices. Operation and/or setup experience a plus.

  • Course length: two days (15 hours)

  • Presented by: Mike Lynch

  • Suggested course manual/s: Machining center manual

  • Students should bring: Note taking materials and calculator

  • Recommended class size: 2 - 20 students

  • Recommended breaks: Five minute breaks each hour and a ten minute break in morning and afternoon

 

Topics:

  1. Machine configurations and directions of motion

  2. General flow of programming process

  3. Visualizing program execution

  4. Understanding program zero

  5. Locating program zero on the machine

  6. How to assign program zero

  7. Introduction to programming words

  8. Preparation for programming

  9. Motion types (rapid, linear, circular)

  10. Introduction to compensation

  11. Tool length compensation

  12. Cutter radius compensation

  13. Fixture offsets

  14. Introduction to program structuring

  15. The four kinds of program format

  16. Canned cycles

  17. Sub programming techniques

  18. Other special features of programming

  19. Rotary tables (optional)

  20. Tasks related to setup and operation

  21. The control and machine panel

  22. The three modes of operation

  23. The key operation procedures

  24. Program verification and optimizing

Turning Center Setup and Operation

A two-day course for your entry level people

CNC operators make up 70% of the CNC workforce. A company having ten CNC machines that is working three shifts will need but one or two CNC programmers and setup people. But if working machines with one operator per machine per shift, they will need thirty operators! It is getting more and more difficult to find and hire qualified CNC operators. Unfortunately, most companies are forced to hire operators with little or no CNC experience - and train them on the job. Because of the sheer number of CNC operators required in most companies - and because new people must be trained as people leave for greener pastures - operator training is an on-going training need.

Most companies simply don't have the resources needed to develop and implement their own CNC operator training courses. So they leave newcomers to figure things out on their own. People with good CNC aptitude and motivation may be able to survive in this situation, but may become frustrated. People without CNC aptitude will fail miserably.

In this course, we present what it takes to be a CNC machining center operator from the ground up. We do assume students possess some basic skills like the ability to perform simple arithmetic calculations, ability to read a blueprint, ability to interpret tolerances, and ability to use the gauging tools your company uses. (We can teach these subjects, but course time must be expanded.) We assume nothing about their current CNC knowledge.

We present material as it relates to two-axis slant bed turning centers (though we can address any form of CNC turning center). Specific techniques are given for the most popular control in the industry, the Fanuc control.

Depending on class size and machine availability, practice can be done on your own machine tools. However, we commonly find that a machine shop makes a very poor learning environment (noisy, distracting, tight quarters, etc.). For this reason, we prefer that training takes place in a classroom environment.

We use our proven key concepts approach to stress the reasons why things are done as importantly as how their done. While many of the key concepts are programming-related, there are many important principles of machine operation that require a limited understanding of how the machine interprets a program.

General:

  • Course name: Turning Center Operation

  • Machine types: Primarily two axis turning centers (but we can address any turning center type)

  • Prerequisites: Knowledge of: blueprint reading, tolerance interpretation, basic arithmetic, gauge reading, and the hand tools your company uses

  • Course length: two days (15 hours)

  • Presented by: Mike Lynch

  • Suggested course manual/s: Turning center manual

  • Students should bring: Note taking materials and calculator

  • Recommended class size: 2 - 20 students

  • Recommended breaks: Five minute breaks each hour and a ten minute break in morning and afternoon

 

Topics:

  1. Machine configurations and directions of motion

  2. Important buttons and switches

  3. Modes of operation

  4. Key operation procedures

  5. The difference between setup and maintaining production

  6. Production-maintaining related tasks

  7. Workpiece loading

  8. Cycle activation buttons and switches

  9. Holding size with wear offsets

  10. Replacing cutting tools

  11. Understanding trial machining

  12. Setup-related tasks

  13. Assigning program zero

  14. Workholding setup

  15. Cutting tool assembly

  16. Program verification techniques

Turning Center Programming

A two-day manual programming course.

It's likely that you have some CNC people that need to be upgraded. And many CNC setup people and operators aspire to become programmers. This course makes an excellent way for to people that have had some CNC experience to get to a higher level.

You may also have CNC people that have worked exclusively with computer aided manufacturing (CAM) systems to prepare programs. These systems, of course, create the same G-code level CNC programs that a manual programmer writes. If your CAM system programmers are to make the best use of your CNC machine tools, they must possess a knowledge of manual programming. This knowledge is required, for example, when programs must be modified at the machine during verification and optimizing. When production time is at a premium, it's usually best to prepare - or at least optimize - programs manually (most of the techniques we show in our setup and cycle time reduction courses require a firm understanding of manual programming).

In this course, students will learn the basics of manual programming. We'll use our proven key concepts approach, stressing the reasons why things are done as importantly as how they're done. We stress programming for two-axis slant-bed turning centers, but content can be expanded to include any turning center type. We can also address various turning center accessories like bar feeder, part catcher, tailstock, and live tooling. Specific examples and techniques will be shown for the most popular control in the industry, the Fanuc control. Practice exercises and programming activities will confirm understanding. We'll even visually demonstrate program execution on a computer software based simulator for each program students write.

Though review periods will be limited during the course due to time constraints, the tutorial course manual provides an excellent way for students to review the course content during the course, and long after the course is completed. We also offer free phone assistance to any student having a question when the course is completed.

General:

  • Course name: Turning Center Programming

  • Machine types: Primarily two-axis slant-bed turning centers (but we can address any turning center type)

  • Prerequisites: An understanding of basic machining practices. Operation and/or setup experience a plus.

  • Course length: two days (15 hours)

  • Presented by: Mike Lynch

  • Suggested course manual/s: Turning center manual

  • Students should bring: Note taking materials and calculator

  • Recommended class size: 2 - 20 students

  • Recommended breaks: Five minute breaks each hour and a ten minute break in morning and afternoon

 

Topics:

  1. Machine configurations and directions of motion

  2. Understanding speed and feedrate modes

  3. Visualizing program execution

  4. Understanding program zero

  5. Locating program zero at the machine

  6. How to assign program zero

  7. General flow of programming

  8. Introduction to programming words

  9. Preparation for programming

  10. Motion types (rapid, linear, circular)

  11. Introduction to compensation

  12. Dimensional (wear) offsets

  13. Tool nose radius compensation

  14. Geometry offsets

  15. Introduction to program structuring

  16. The four kinds of program format

  17. Simple canned cycles

  18. Rough turning and boring cycle followed by finishing

  19. More multiple repetitive cycles

  20. Thread programming

  21. Sub programming techniques

  22. Other special features of programming

  23. The control panel

  24. The machine panel

  25. The three modes of operation

  26. The key operation procedures

  27. Program verification

 

Parametric Programming For CNC Machining And Turning Centers

Learn the best kept secret of CNC in this two-day course!

We've always said that parametric programming is one of CNC's best kept secrets. While more and more people are becoming familiar with this powerful programming tool, there are still many in the industry that don't even know what it is, let alone how to take advantage of its many features. At the very least, all CNC people should know the applications for parametric programming. Better yet, they should be able to apply this powerful tool to reduce setup time and cycle time, facilitate CNC machine utilization, make programming easier, and in general, make their CNC machines easier to work with.

In this comprehensive course, you'll learn what parametric programming is, it's five application categories, its features, and how to apply it. An ample supply of examples is given for all application categories. While we stress Fanuc's version of parametric programming, custom macro B, we can also address Okuma's version called user task 2 and Fadal's version called macro. Both machining center and turning center applications are shown.

While we assume you have a good understanding of standard G-code-level manual programming as you begin this course, we assume nothing about your current knowledge about parametric programming. So when it comes to parametric programming, we start from scratch. While an elementary understanding of computer programming helps, we don't assume you have computer programming experience.

All presentations are applications based. Each step of the way, we show real-world applications that you can easily adapt to your specific needs. There are plenty of examples and we stress the reasons why features are available as well as how they can help you (compare this your control manufacturer's descriptions of parametric programming in their programming manual).

General:

  • Course name: Parametric programming

  • Machine types: Machining centers and turning centers

  • Prerequisites: Knowledge of G-code level manual programming for the machine type/s of interest

  • Course length: two days (15 hours)

  • Presented by: Mike Lynch

  • Suggested course manual/s: Parametric programming manual

  • Students should bring: Note taking materials and calculator

  • Recommended class size: 2 - 20 students

  • Recommended breaks: Five minute breaks each hour and a ten minute break in morning and afternoon

 

Topics:

  • Introduction to parametric programming

    • Benefits, applications, feature types

  • Variable techniques

    • Arguments, local variables, common variables, permanent common variables, system variables

  • Arithmetic capabilities

    • Add, subtract, multiply, divide, sine, cosine, tangent, square root, etc.

  • Logic and program flow control

    • Statement labels, unconditional branching (GOTO), conditional branching (IF)

  • Generating loops

    • With IF, with WHILE

  • System variables

    • Offset access, alarm generation, stop with message, position access

  • Other CNC features of parametric programming

    • Creating G and M codes, program protection, output of data

  • Approaching and verifying parametric programs

    • For all application categories

The CNC Tune-Up

Give your CNC environment a tune-up in this 2-3 day course.

Every CNC manager wants highly motivated, proficient people to program, setup, and operate their CNC machine tools -- but getting there has never been easy. Most companies depend solely on basic courses conducted by local technical schools and machine tool suppliers. While basic courses are very important, most stress only generic and easy-to-handle CNC problems. Unfortunately, the easiest way to handle a problem is seldom the most efficient way!

CNC Tune-Up is a training course held in your own facility that's custom-tailored to your specific needs. Aimed primarily at your experienced CNC people, improving CNC utilization is our primary goal. The CNC turn-up can last from three to five days, depending upon the number of sessions you wish to schedule and the number of people who will be attending.

Free performance evaluation! 


Your people will not be the only ones studying. Our instructor will also be learning. Learning how your programmers design cutting tools, setups and programs -- learning how your CNC operators run the equipment -- learning how your setup people make setups -- and in general, learning your company's current CNC methods. Based on his findings, you will be given an evaluation of your company's current CNC performance level. In many cases, you can pay for the cost of your CNC Tune-Up by simply implementing the improvements he recommends!

General:

  • Course name: CNC tune-up

  • Machine types: Machining centers and turning centers

  • Prerequisites: Knowledge of G-code level manual programming for the machine type/s of interest

  • Course length: Multiple days depending upon interests

  • Presented by: Mike Lynch

  • Suggested course manual/s: Getting More from Your CNC Machines

  • Students should bring: Note taking materials and calculator

  • Recommended class size: 2 - 20 students

  • Recommended breaks: Five minute breaks each hour and a ten minute break in morning and afternoon

 

Topics:

Any of these sessions can be modified to suit your specific needs. In fact, we'll need you to help us understand your company profile before we can finalize the design of your CNC Tune-Up. The sessions we list are just to provide a starting point. Rest assured we can structure these sessions in a way that makes the best sense for your company.

CNC basics (2 hour - 2 days)

Depending upon your current CNC level, it we offer three alternatives for this session. First, if you wish us to completely train CNC novices from scratch, we recommend at least two days per machine type. Second, if you wish to give people in your company that are not working directly with CNC equipment (design engineers, managers, tool designers) an introduction to CNC principles, we offer a one-day introductory session. Third, if all people included in your CNC Tune-Up have extensive CNC experience, we recommend a quick two-hour review of the basics.

Advanced CNC techniques (one day)

Today's market is competitive. Often the only difference between profit and loss is one company's ability to do something a little better or faster than their competition. This session will relate many special techniques that are not taught in basic CNC courses.

CNC setup time reduction (one day)

The more setups you make, the more important it is that your setups be made as efficiently as possible. This session will introduce the basics of setup time reduction and show countless specific techniques that can be applied to CNC machines to reduce setup time. Everything from making the last workpiece in the previous production run to making the first good workpiece in the next production run is covered.

CNC cycle time reduction (one day)

The higher your production quantities, the more important it will be that your CNC cycles run as efficiently as possible. This session will introduce the principles of cycle time reduction and show countless specific techniques that will reduce cycle time on CNC equipment.

Other sessions you can include in your CNC-Tune-Up

While we recommend that the previously mentioned sessions be included in all CNC Tune-Ups, you can further tailor your sessions to suit your own needs. Other sessions you can include are Parametric Programming (2 days), How To Teach CNC Principles (1 day), Control Parameters (2 hours), Documentation Issues (3 hours).

Pricing for In-Plant Training

Pricing is based on the number of days (specified for each class below), the number of students, and travel expenses:

  • $2,000 per day of training

  • $50.00 per student (for manuals)

  • Travel expenses (airline tickets/auto mileage, car rental, lodging, plus $30 per day)

Note: An additional charge may be required for customized curriculum.

To get started

Contact us (847-639-8847) to discuss your specific needs and schedule training.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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